The future of recycling plastic

The amount of plastic being recycled is increasing year-on-year, with almost 400,000 tonnes of plastic bottles being recycled compared to only 13,000 tonnes in 2000. Approximately 77% of plastic bottles and 32% of all plastic are now recycled.

Here at Measom Freer, we are serious about the planet, how plastic waste can affect the environment and the importance of recycling plastic bottles. As such, we manufacture our plastic responsibly, to reduce the impact on the environment. This means our products, including plastic bottles, are manufactured with recyclable thermoplastic.

We can reduce any waste through the use of ‘closed-loop’ recycling during the manufacturing process – with typically up to 30% regrind within production, made up from runners, sprues, tops, and tails.

Measom Freer is also a member of the RECycling of Used Plastics Limited (RECOUP), a charity and leading authority responsible for the provision of expertise and guidance across the plastics recycling value chain. RECOUP is also committed to securing sustainable, circular and practical solutions for plastic resources on a global stage.

Choosing to repurpose or reuse your plastic bottles is another way to help benefit the environment, but if you don’t want to do that, you can take them to the designated recycling area with your local council authority.

To see how we can help you choose plastic bottles that are recyclable, visit our site or give us a ring on 0116 288 1588.

The future of recycling bottles

So what’s next for the future of recycling when it comes to plastic? Well, in May 2021, the Government announced a scheme to reimburse people for returning their plastic bottles for recycling.

This would see shoppers reimbursed 20p per plastic bottle that they return to the deposit return scheme. To pay for this initiative, 20p will be added to the price of the product, which, of course, will be returned to the shopper when they effectively recycle.

Following on from this, the Government hopes to implement the use of scannable codes on all plastic packaging, which would then be returned to a kerbside collection or a ‘smart bin’ – known as the Digital Deposit Return Scheme (DDRS). It is hoped that these schemes would significantly increase recycling levels – and reduce the size of landfills.

What next?

Whilst these initiatives gain traction before being launched sometime in the next few years, how do you recycle your plastic bottles before then? At Measom Freer, we have a wide variety of plastic bottles and products that are 100% recyclable, including all post-consumer regrind (PCR) bottles and PCR polypropylene (PP) caps.

Wherever possible we add the Society of the Plastics Industry (SPI) Recycling Codes to the product to help identify the material used – to ensure you recycle our products in the correct way.

The Plastic Packaging Tax, which comes into effect on 1st April, will hopefully drive the infrastructure necessary for the UK recycling sector to produce more post-consumer (PCR) and industrial (PIR) recycled material.

Measom Freer are continually testing new recycled materials in their processes and can now boast a Recycled Bottle Range along with recycled caps, nozzle caps and measuring scoops all now available from stock.  

Contact us

If you are looking to purchase some recyclable plastic products for your business or personal use, then we have a whole host of plastic bottles and containers, of different capacities, shapes and caps to choose from.

We’re confident you can find exactly what you are looking for – just visit our website or give us a call on 0116 288 1588 and we’ll be happy to help.

 

 

 

 

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